Category: yes

On this day in music history: November 7, 1983 – “90125”, the eleventh album by Yes is released. Produced by Trevor Horn, it is recorded at SARM West Studios and AIR Studios in London from January 1982, and November 1982 – July 1983. By 1980, founding members lead vocalist Jon Anderson and keyboardist Rick Wakeman depart Yes, moving on to solo projects. Their places are taken by Geoff Downes and Trevor Horn. This line up is short lived, recording and releasing the album “Drama” before Yes disbands completely in December of 1980. After the split, Downes goes on to form Asia with former Yes guitarist Steve Howe, bassist John Wetton and former Emerson Lake & Palmer drummer Carl Palmer. South African born guitarist Trevor Rabin tries out for the guitarist spot in Asia, but ends up connecting with Yes members Chris Squire and Alan White. The trio forms a new band calling themselves Cinema, and begin working on material (including songs that Rabin had written for a solo project), and recording an album in late 1982. The project takes a major turn in the Spring of 1983 when Chris Squire plays some of the work in progress for Jon Anderson. Anderson like the songs so much, that he is invited to participate in the sessions. Without it being intended, the album turns into a reunion of Yes, though keyboardist Tony Kaye sits out much of the recording, not getting along with producer Horn (most of the keyboards are played by Rabin). Yes’ modern streamlined sound differs noticeably from their classic progressive rock period, but in turn wins them a whole new generation of fans. It spins off three singles including Owner Of A Lonely Heart” (#1 Pop), and “Leave It” (#24 Pop). The video for “Leave It”, directed by Godley & Creme, is produced with eighteen variations. A making of documentary for the clip is aired on MTV in early 1984, with all of the variations being aired only once. The album is titled after the catalog number assigned to it, with the distinctive cover graphics being designed using the Robograph 1000 system, utilizing an Apple IIE computer (by graphic artist Garry Mouat at Assorted Images). Yes wins a Grammy Award for Best Rock Instrumental Performance for the track “Cinema” in 1985. First issued on CD in 1984, the album is remastered and reissued in 2004, with six additional bonus tracks. It is also reissued as a hybrid SACD by Warner Music Japan in 2014. The vinyl edition is remastered and reissued as a 180 gram LP by Friday Music in 2009. It is reissued by Rhino Records as a limited edition picture disc for Black Friday Record Store Day in November of 2017. Rhino again reissues it on limited edition vinyl (6,500 copies), as part of their “Back To The 80’s” reissue series in July of 2018. Replicating the original LP packaging, it is pressed on pink, yellow and blue tri-color vinyl. “90125" peaks at number five on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified 3x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

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YES – Fat Joe ft. Cardi B & Anuel AA

Yes – Richie Wess ft. Young Scooter & Yung Dred

On this day in music history: November 26, 1971 – “Fragile”, the fourth album by Yes is released in the UK (US release is on January 4, 1972). Produced by Yes and Eddy Offord, it is recorded at Advision Studios in London in September 1971. Making their recording debut in 1969 with their self titled debut album, Yes record “Time And A Word” and “The Yes Album” over the next two years, while building a solid following throughout Europe and in the US. Yes gain valuable exposure opening for other bands including Iron Butterfly and Jethro Tull. With the latter album gaining the band their first hit in the UK and a sizable toehold in the US, they begin writing material for their fourth album in mid 1971. Staying in a rented farmhouse in Devon, Yes continue writing and rehearsing the new songs they’ve written. It is the first album to feature new keyboardist Rick Wakeman who replaces Tony Kaye midway through pre-production. Guitarist Steve Howe and Wakeman become essential elements in the evolution of Yes’ sound, bringing their interest in classical music and training into the musical landscape. Originally intending to record a double album consisting of both live recordings and studio material, Yes end up dropping the idea when they realize the amount of time it will take to create such a project. They also initially intend to come to US to work with Atlantic Records’ staff producer and engineer Tom Dowd at Criteria Studios in Miami, but does not pan out. Instead, the band work with Eddy Offord who has engineered their previous two albums, having been promoted to co-producer status on “The Yes Album”. Anchored by the track “Roundabout” (#13 US Pop), it is the bands’ breakthrough on a worldwide basis and is regarded as a landmark progressive rock album. The LP’s cover artwork is illustrated by artist Roger Dean, who goes on to design several album covers for the band including their famous logo (first used on the follow up “Close To The Edge”). The album is remastered and reissued a number of times over the years, most recently being reissued in 2015 in the UK as a CD/high resolution Blu-Ray Audio set. The redbook CD contains the original stereo mix of the album, with the Blu-Ray disc featuring new stereo and 5.1 surround sound mixes by Steven Wilson, along side the original stereo mixes also presented in high resolution. “Fragile” peaks at number seven on the UK album chart, number four on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified 2x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

On this day in music history: November 7, 1983 – “90125”, the eleventh album by Yes is released. Produced by Trevor Horn, it is recorded at SARM West Studios and AIR Studios in London from January 1982, and November 1982 – July 1983. By 1980, founding members lead vocalist Jon Anderson and keyboardist Rick Wakeman depart Yes, moving on to solo projects. Their places are taken by Geoff Downes and Trevor Horn. This line up is short lived, recording and releasing the album “Drama” before Yes disbands completely in December of 1980. After the split, Downes goes on to form Asia with former Yes guitarist Steve Howe, bassist John Wetton and former Emerson Lake & Palmer drummer Carl Palmer. South African born guitarist Trevor Rabin tries out for the guitarist spot in Asia, but ends up connecting with Yes members Chris Squire and Alan White. The trio forms a new band calling themselves Cinema, and begin working on material (including songs that Rabin had written for a solo project), and recording an album in late 1982. The project takes a major turn in the Spring of 1983 when Chris Squire plays some of the work in progress for Jon Anderson. Anderson like the songs so much, that he is invited to participate in the sessions. Without it being intended, the album turns into a reunion of Yes, though keyboardist Tony Kaye sits out much of the recording, not getting along with producer Horn (most of the keyboards are played by Rabin). Yes’ modern streamlined sound differs noticeably from their classic progressive rock period, but in turn wins them a whole new generation of fans. It spins off three singles including Owner Of A Lonely Heart” (#1 Pop), and “Leave It” (#24 Pop). The video for “Leave It”, directed by Godley & Creme, is produced with eighteen variations. A making of documentary for the clip is aired on MTV in early 1984, with all of the variations being aired only once. The album is titled after the catalog number assigned to it, with the distinctive cover graphics being designed using the Robograph 1000 system, utilizing an Apple IIE computer (by graphic artist Garry Mouat at Assorted Images). Yes wins a Grammy Award for Best Rock Instrumental Performance for the track “Cinema” in 1985. First issued on CD in 1984, the album is remastered and reissued in 2004, with six additional bonus tracks. It is also reissued as a hybrid SACD by Warner Music Japan in 2014. The vinyl edition is remastered and reissued as a 180 gram LP by Friday Music in 2009. It is reissued by Rhino Records as a limited edition picture disc for Black Friday Record Store Day in November of 2017. Rhino again reissues it on limited edition vinyl (6,500 copies), as part of their “Back To The 80’s” reissue series in July of 2018. Replicating the original LP packaging, it is pressed on pink, yellow and blue tri-color vinyl. “90125" peaks at number five on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified 3x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

On this day in music history: September 13, 1972 – “Close To The Edge” the fifth album by Yes is released. Produced by Eddy Offord and Yes, it is recorded at Advision Studios in London from Early – Mid 1972. After the huge commercial breakthrough success of their then current album “Fragile” and the tour that follows, Yes will not stop to rest on their laurels,  and immediately begin work on what is their most ambitious work to date. Composed of only three tracks, it is dominated by two extended side long suites titled “Close To The Edge” and “And You And I” (consisting of four movements per side that are linked together) clocking in at eighteen and nineteen minutes each. The first half written by lead singer Jon Anderson and guitarist Steve Howe, is inspired by German author Herman Hesse’s novel “Siddartha”, which at the time is being read by Anderson, who is fascinated by the main character’s quest for spiritual enlightenment. The theme of spirituality also extends to the albums second half “And You And I”, with further musical contributions from the other band members. The cover artwork designed by artist Roger Dean is the first to feature the now famous “Yes” bubble logo that become synonymous with the band. The album is released to a rapturous reception by fans and critics alike, and is widely regarded to be one of the best progressive rock albums of all time, also becoming Yes’ commercially successful release. Out of print on vinyl since the late 80’s, it is remastered and reissued as a 180 gram LP by Friday Music in 2008. The vinyl edition is remastered and reissued again in 2012. In 2013, the album is given new stereo and 5.1 surround mixes by Steven Wilson, and released as a CD + Blu-ray disc deluxe edition. “Close To The Edge” peaks at number three on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

On this day in music history: January 21, 1984 – “Owner Of A Lonely Heart” by Yes hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 2 weeks, also peaking at #69 on the R&B singles chart on the same date. Written by Trevor Rabin, Jon Anderson, Chris Squire and Trevor Horn, it is the biggest hit for the British progressive rock band fronted by lead singer Jon Anderson. The song originates with guitarist Trevor Rabin who demos it with the intention of giving it to another artist to record. Producer Trevor Horn hears the song while working on Yes’ album. Feeling that the album still lacks a hit single, Horn hears Rabin’s demo and after more than six months, finally persuades Rabin to let Yes record it. The song is re-worked with Horn, bassist Chris Squire and vocalist Jon Anderson re-writing the lyrics and part of the music. “Owner” is released the first single from the band’s eleventh studio album “90125” in the Fall of 1983. Entering the Hot 100 at #62 on November 5, 1983, it climbs to the top of the chart eleven weeks later. “Owner Of A Lonely Heart” brings the veteran band a new generation of fans when MTV and pop radio embraces their new modernized sound. Two different videos for the song are made directed by Aubrey Powell and Storm Thorgerson of Hipgnosis. The first being a straight forward performance clip shot on video tape (which is not released until years after the fact), and the second a concept clip (inter cut with newly filmed performance footage of Yes) shot on 35mm film. Three different edits of the second clip are shown during the songs’ run on the charts. An extended version running nearly seven minutes, a shorter version of the clip (the one most shown), and a third featuring just the performance footage of the band. A remixed version of “Owner Of A Lonely Heart” by producer Trevor Horn (titled the “Red And Blue Dance Mix”) also becoming a big hit on the dance floor peaking at #3 on the Billboard Club Play chart. "Owner Of A Lonely Heart" is later sampled by numerous artists including Frank Zappa, Michael Jackson, LL Cool J, Salt ‘N’ Pepa, En Vogue, “Weird Al” Yankovic, Kris Kross, and Lil’ Wayne. Dance group Kyper also samples the song as the basis of their hit single “Tic Tac Toe” in 1990. 

On this day in music history: November 26, 1971 – “Fragile”, the fourth album by Yes is released in the UK (US release is on January 4, 1972). Produced by Yes and Eddy Offord, it is recorded at Advision Studios in London in September 1971. Making their recording debut in 1969 with their self titled debut album, Yes record “Time And A Word” and “The Yes Album” over the next two years, while building a solid following throughout Europe and in the US. Yes gain valuable exposure opening for other bands including Iron Butterfly and Jethro Tull. With the latter album gaining the band their first hit in the UK and a sizable toehold in the US, they begin writing material for their fourth album in mid 1971. Staying in a rented farmhouse in Devon, Yes continue writing and rehearsing the new songs they’ve written. It is the first album to feature new keyboardist Rick Wakeman who replaces Tony Kaye midway through pre-production. Guitarist Steve Howe and Wakeman become essential elements in the evolution of Yes’ sound, bringing their interest in classical music and training into the musical landscape. Originally intending to record a double album consisting of both live recordings and studio material, Yes end up dropping the idea when they realize the amount of time it will take to create such a project. They also initially intend to come to US to work with Atlantic Records’ staff producer and engineer Tom Dowd at Criteria Studios in Miami, but does not pan out. Instead, the band work with Eddy Offord who has engineered their previous two albums, having been promoted to co-producer status on “The Yes Album”. Anchored by the track “Roundabout” (#13 US Pop), it is the bands’ breakthrough on a worldwide basis and is regarded as a landmark progressive rock album. The LP’s cover artwork is illustrated by artist Roger Dean, who goes on to design several album covers for the band including their famous logo (first used on the follow up “Close To The Edge”). The album is remastered and reissued a number of times over the years, most recently being reissued in 2015 in the UK as a CD/high resolution Blu-Ray Audio set. The redbook CD contains the original stereo mix of the album, with the Blu-Ray disc featuring new stereo and 5.1 surround sound mixes by Steven Wilson, along side the original stereo mixes also presented in high resolution. “Fragile” peaks at number seven on the UK album chart, number four on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified 2x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

Ye’s (Prod. by TM88) – Roscoe Dash

On this day in music history: November 7, 1983 – “90125”, the eleventh album by Yes is released. Produced by Trevor Horn, it is recorded at SARM West Studios and AIR Studios in London from January 1982, and November 1982 – July 1983. By 1980, founding members lead vocalist Jon Anderson and keyboardist Rick Wakeman depart Yes, moving on to solo projects.  Their places are taken by Geoff Downes and Trevor Horn. This line up of the band will be short lived, recording and releasing the album “Drama” before Yes disbands completely in December of 1980. After the split, Downes goes on to form Asia with former Yes guitarist Steve Howe, bassist John Wetton and former Emerson Lake & Palmer drummer Carl Palmer.  South African born guitarist Trevor Rabin tries out for the guitarist spot in Asia, but ends up connecting with Yes members Chris Squire and Alan White. The trio forms a new band calling themselves Cinema, and begin working on material (including songs that Rabin had written for a solo project), and recording an album in late 1982. The project takes a major turn in the Spring of 1983 when Chris Squire plays some of the work in progress for Jon Anderson. Anderson likes the songs so much that he is invited to participate in the sessions. Without it being intended, the album turns into a reunion of Yes, though keyboardist Tony Kaye sits out much of the recording, not getting along with producer Horn (most of the keyboards are played by Rabin on the album). Yes’ modern streamlined sound differs noticeably from their classic progressive rock period, but in turn wins them a whole new generation of fans. It spins off three singles including Yes’ biggest hit Owner Of A Lonely Heart” (#1 Pop), and “Leave It” (#24 Pop). The album is titled after the catalog number assigned to it, with the distinctive cover graphics being designed using the Robograph 1000 system utilising Apple IIE computer (by graphic artist Garry Mouat at Assorted Images). Yes wins a Grammy Award for Best Rock Instrumental Performance for the track “Cinema” in 1985. “90125″ peaks at number five on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified 3x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.