Category: r&b

After 4AM (EP) – Amerie

After 4AM (EP) – Amerie

4AM Mulholland (EP) – Amerie

4AM Mulholland (EP) – Amerie

Suncity (EP) – Khalid

Suncity (EP) – Khalid

Lost (EP) – Brent Faiyaz

Lost (EP) – Brent Faiyaz

On this day in music history: October 18, 1977…

On this day in music history: October 18, 1977 – “Goin’ Places”, the eleventh album by The Jacksons is released. Produced by Kenneth Gamble, Leon Huff, Gene McFadden, John Whitehead, Victor Carstarphen, Dexter Wansel and The Jacksons, it is recorded at Sigma Sound Studios in Philadelphia, PA from December 1976 – August 1977. The groups second album on Epic Records like the first is produced by Gamble & Huff and several other Philadelphia International staff writers and producers. It lacks a major hit single, becoming one of the groups poorest selling albums, barely selling 300,000 copies in the US (next to “2300 Jackson Street” in 1989). Though it is the first release in which The Jacksons begin writing their own material (contributing two songs). This opportunity for greater expression comes to full fruition on their next album, when The Jacksons are finally allowed the creative freedom they have long desired. Along with the original vinyl LP, it is also issued as a limited edition picture disc that becomes a collector’s item. It spins off three singles including “Find Me A Girl” (#38 R&B) and the title track (#8 R&B, #52 Pop). The tracks “Different Kind Of Lady”, “Jump for Joy” and “Music’s Takin’ Over” become break outs hit in discos, continuing the succession of underground club classics their albums have generated since the part of their tenure at Motown. Originally issued on CD in the late 80’s, it is remastered and reissued in Japan in 2009, packaged in a mini cardboard sleeve. It is subsequently remastered and reissued again in 2010, and as a Blu-Spec CD in 2016. Out of print on vinyl for over three decades, it is remastered and reissued by Sony/Legacy in 2018. “Goin’ Places” peaks at number eleven on the Billboard R&B album chart, and number sixty three on the Top 200.

On this day in music history: October 18, 1969…

On this day in music history: October 18, 1969 – “I Can’t Get Next To You” by The Temptations hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 2 weeks, also topping the R&B singles chart for 5 weeks on October 4, 1969. Written by Norman Whitfield and Barrett Strong, it is the ninth R&B chart topper and second pop number one for the Motown vocal quintet. On a roll after changing lead vocalists and going in a bold new musical direction in 1968, The Temptations continue their hot streak into 1969. Much like their groundbreaking single “Cloud Nine”, the groups hit from earlier in the year, producer Norman Whitfield arranges the song so that all five members of the Tempts rotate singing lead through the course of the song, borrowing the template from Sly & The Family Stone’s “Dance To The Music”. The basic track is recorded at Motown’s Studio A in Detroit on June 23, 1969 with members of The Funk Brothers playing on it. Further overdubs are recorded on June 24, 27, 30, and July 2, 1969. The Temptations add their vocals on July 3, 1969. Released on July 30, 1969, it quickly becomes a smash. Entering the Hot 100 at #84 on August 16, 1969, it climbs to the top of the chart nine weeks later. An instrumental mix of the song is featured on the Deluxe Edition of the soundtrack for “Standing In The Shadows Of Motown” in 2002. “I Can’t Get Next To You” is certified Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

On this day in music history: October 18, 1969…

On this day in music history: October 18, 1969 – The Jackson 5 make their national television debut on the variety show “The Hollywood Palace” on the ABC television network. The show is hosted that week by Diana Ross and Sammy Davis, Jr.. The group perform four songs including their debut single “I Want You Back”, “Sing A Simple Song”, and “Can You Remember”. The performance is also recreated in the television mini series “The Jacksons: An American Dream” in 1992.

Born on this day: October 18, 1926 – Rock &amp…

Born on this day: October 18, 1926 – Rock & Roll pioneer Chuck Berry (born Charles Edward Anderson Berry in St. Louis, MO). Happy Birthday to this musical icon on what would have been his 92nd Birthday.

Quemix 3 (Mixtape) – Jacquees

Quemix 3 (Mixtape) – Jacquees

On this day in music history: October 17, 1988…

On this day in music history: October 17, 1988 – “Giving You The Best That I Got”, the third album by Anita Baker is released. Produced by Michael J. Powell, it is recorded at Encore Studios in Burbank, CA, Yamaha International Recording in Glendale, CA, Sound Suite Studio, Gnome Studios in Los Angeles, CA, Hitsville Studios in Hollywood, CA and TMF Studios in New York City from Late 1987 – Mid 1988. Issued as the follow up to her multi-platinum, Grammy winning breakthrough “Rapture”, Baker’s label Elektra Records pressures the singer to hand the album in by a certain date when they feel she is taking an excessive amount of time mixing the record. Her then manager Sherwin Bash takes early mix down reels from the studio with the intent of giving them to the label for manufacture. When Baker finds out, she orders that the tapes be returned immediately and destroyed. When the album is finally mixed to her satisfaction, the master tapes are turned in to Elektra. The album is a huge critical and commercial success upon its release, spinning off three singles including “Just Because” (#1 R&B, #14 Pop) and the title track (#1 R&B, #3 Pop). It also wins Baker three Grammy Awards including her second wins for Best R&B Song and Best R&B Vocal Performance, Female in 1989. “Giving You The Best That I Got” spends eight weeks (non-consecutive) at number one on the Billboard R&B album chart, four weeks at the top of the Top 200, and is certified 3x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.