Category: rap

Born on this day: May 21, 1972 – Rap music leg…

Born on this day: May 21, 1972 – Rap music legend The Notorious B.I.G. (born Christopher George Latore Wallace in New York City, NY). Happy Birthday to this Hip Hop icon on what would have been his 47th Birthday.

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Ty Dolla $ign (Feat. J. Cole) – Purple Emoji

Ty Dolla $ign (Feat. J. Cole) – Purple Emoji

Flipp Dinero – If I Tell You

Flipp Dinero – If I Tell You

Mac Miller – Benji The Dog

Mac Miller – Benji The Dog

NLE Choppa x Clever – Stick By My Side

NLE Choppa x Clever – Stick By My Side

Killy – Swag Flu

Killy – Swag Flu

On this day in music history: May 17, 1988 – &…

On this day in music history: May 17, 1988 – “Tougher Than Leather”, the fourth album by Run-DMC is released. Produced by Run-DMC, Davy D. and Rick Rubin, it is recorded at Chung King Studios, Unique Recording Studios, Electric Lady Studios, Greene St. Recording Studios in New York City and Ian London Studios in East Islip, NY from Mid 1987 – Early 1988. Having achieved unprecedented success for a rap group with their their third album “Raising Hell”, Run-DMC tour extensively during 1986 and 1987. Ambitious to not only maintain their newly found star status, but go to the next level, the group not only plan a new album, but a feature film as well. Run-DMC return to the studio to work on their fourth album “Tougher Than Leather”. Working again with Rick Rubin, the group also collaborate with David “Davy D.” Reeves (“One For The Treble (Fresh)”) on the album. Musically, “Leather” differs noticeably from its predecessor. With contemporaries like Public Enemy, Eric B. & Rakim and Boogie Down Productions rapidly changing the face of Hip Hop, Run-DMC also look to diversify their sound. Though not technically a soundtrack album, it also features several songs in the film they are set to star in. Also titled “Tougher Than Leather”, the film is co-written and directed by Rick Rubin. The group star as themselves, out to solve the murder of their friend and roadie Runny Ray (Raymond White). “Leather” also features cameos and musical performances by Slick Rick and The Beastie Boys. The film receives universally negative reviews upon its release in September of 1988, and is in and out of theaters quickly. So far, it has only been given a brief release on VHS tape, but has remained out of print for over thirty years. The album fairs significantly better, spinning off four singles including “Run’s House” (b/w “Beats To The Rhyme”) (#10 R&B), “Mary, Mary” (#29 R&B, #75 Pop), “I’m Not Going Out Like That” (#40 R&B) and “Papa Crazy”. Though it sells decently, it falls far short of the triple Platinum sales of “Raising Hell”, with many fans feeling that “Tougher Than Leather” pales in comparison to the previous album. In 2001, director Kevin Smith uses the title song in his film and on the soundtrack of “Jay And Silent Bob Strike Back”. “Leather” is remastered and reissued on CD in 1999, when Profile Records is absorbed by Arista. A second CD reissue in 2005 includes four bonus tracks, including the holiday single “Christmas In Hollis”. Out of print on vinyl since its original release, its reissued by Music On Vinyl in 2014, and again by Get On Down Records in 2017. “Tougher Than Leather” peaks at number two on the Billboard R&B album chart, number ten on the Top 200, and is certified Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

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$uicideboy$ x Travis Barker – Aliens Are Ghost…

$uicideboy$ x Travis Barker – Aliens Are Ghosts

On this day in music history: May 15, 1986 – &…

On this day in music history: May 15, 1986 – “Raising Hell”, the third album by Run-DMC is released. Produced by Run-DMC, Rick Rubin and Russell Simmons., it is recorded at Chung King Studios, Shakedown Sound Studios, Soundtrack Studios and Magic Venture Studios in New York City from January – March 1986. Enjoying major success with their first two albums, Run-DMC begin work on their third in early 1986. Instead of producer Larry Smith, the group decide to change things up and work with Def Jam co-founder Rick Rubin. Fully rehearsed and prepared with notebooks packed with new rhymes, Run and D are ready to bring it as well. At one point, Rubin suggests that Run-DMC cover Aerosmith’s 70’s rock classic “Walk This Way” (#4 Pop, #8 R&B, #6 Club Play). Though familiar with the opening drum break (having rhymed over it for years), they hadn’t heard the whole song. When they do, they fall about laughing, calling it “corny” and “hillbilly”. Run and D are convinced to do it, with Rick suggesting they remake it as a duet with Steven Tyler and Joe Perry of Aerosmith. After it’s complete, Simmons and McDaniels are still unsure about it. Much to their surprise, it receives radio play immediately, leading Profile Records to issue it as the follow up to “My Adidas” / “Peter Piper” (#5 R&B, #33 Rap). “Walk This Way” is accompanied by a music video (directed by Jon Small), that pit Run-DMC and Jam Master Jay against Tyler and Perry, ending with them rocking out on stage together. A huge radio and MTV hit, the song propels Run-DMC into the stratosphere. “Walk” also revives Aerosmith’s career, setting the stage for their huge comeback. “Hell” spins off a total of four singles including “You Be Illin’” (#12 R&B, #29 Pop) and “It’s Tricky” (#21 R&B, #57 Pop), with the latter featuring a humorous video with magicians Penn & Teller. “Raising Hell” makes history as the first rap album to reach multi-Platinum status in the US, furthering Hip Hop’s reach into mainstream public consciousness. It receives a Grammy nomination for Best R&B Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal in 1987. The album cover art is released with two different color variations. One cover is tinted purple (front) and red (back), with the graphics in green (front) and blue (back). The second cover is tinted green (front) and blue (back) with the title and artists graphics printed in hot pink (front) and orange (back). It is remastered and reissued on CD in 2005, with five additional bonus tracks. It is most recently reissued as a 180 gram LP by Get On Down Records in 2017. In 2018, it’s selected for preservation by the National Recording Registry by the Library Of Congress. “Raising Hell” spends seven weeks (non-consecutive) at number one on the Billboard R&B album chart, peaking at number three on the Top 200, and is certified 3x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

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On this day in music history: May 14, 1991 -…

On this day in music history: May 14, 1991 – “De La Soul Is Dead”, the second album by De La Soul is released. Produced by Prince Paul and De La Soul, it is recorded at Calliope Studios in New York City from Mid 1990 – Early 1991. After the groundbreaking success of their landmark debut album “3 Feet High And Rising”, De La Soul deliberately move away from the sound and image established on that album. Shaking off being labeled “hippies” by the music press and many fans for stretching the boundaries of hip hop on the first album, De La declares that the “D.A.I.S.Y. ("Da Inner Sound Y’all”) Age is over on their sophomore release “De La Soul Is Dead”. The group drive the point home further by featuring an illustration of an overturned and broken flowerpot of daisies on the front cover. Once again working with producer and DJ Prince Paul, the songs are linked together by a series of skits featuring Jeff, the character introduced on the earlier non album B-sides “Brainwashed Follower Of Fashion” and “The Mack Daddy On The Left”, finding a tape of De La’s album discarded in the trash. Jeff is beat up and robbed of the tape by a pair of bullies (played by DJ Maseo and Mista Lawnge of Black Sheep). The skit portions of the album are followed by a turn the page tone taken from a children’s “listen and read” record. It ends on a sardonic and ironic note, with the bullies throwing the tape back in the trash. Musically, it is as diverse and eclectic as the first, but with more of an emphasis on R&B, funk and jazz samples. The subject matter of the songs run a wide gamut, from the group lampooning wannabe rappers looking to get put on (“Ring, Ring, Ring (Ha Ha Hey)” (#3 Rap, #22 R&B), to the more serious topic of child sexual abuse (“Millie Pulled A Pistol On Santa”). It spins off three singles including “A Rollerskating Jam Called Saturdays” (#6 Club Play, #43 R&B) and “Keepin’ The Faith” (the double A-side flip to “Millie”). Clocking in at over seventy three and a half minutes, Tommy Boy services the album to radio and club DJ’s as a special double vinyl pressing (stock pressings are pressed on a single LP, and suffer from greatly diminished sound quality), packaged in a custom double pocket sleeve, and limited to 2,000 numbered copies. In time this promo pressing has become a sought after collector’s item, and has been widely bootlegged. The label reissues the vinyl on double vinyl in 2008. The vinyl edition is reissued by the vinyl subscription service Vinyl Me, Please in March of 2019. Limited to only 1,000 numbered copies, the double LP set is pressed on yellow and green split colored vinyl. “De La Soul Is Dead” peaks at number number twenty four on the Billboard R&B album chart, number twenty six on the Top 200, and is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

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