Category: electronic

Autumn Keys – Doobie

Autumn Keys – Doobie

Porter Robinson – Sad Machine (Onumi Remix)

Porter Robinson – Sad Machine (Onumi Remix)

Ekali (Feat. K. Flay) – Forgot How To Dream

Ekali (Feat. K. Flay) – Forgot How To Dream

On this day in music history: October 11, 1988…

On this day in music history: October 11, 1988 – “Introspective”, the third album by the Pet Shop Boys is released. Produced by the Pet Shop Boys, Trevor Horn, Stephen Lipson, Lewis A. Martineé, David Jacob and Julian Mendelsohn, it is recorded at Advision Studios, Sarm West Studios in London, International Sound Recording Studios and Criteria Recording Studios in Miami, FL from December 1987 – July 1988. Just a few months after the release of their second studio album “Actually”, the Pet Shop Boys start work on their third full length album. As well as working their regular collaborators Julian Mendelsohn and David Jacob, Tennant and Lowe also work with producers Trevor Horn, Stephen Lipson (Frankie Goes To Hollywood), and Expose producer Lewis A. Martineé. PSB also employ the assistance of legendary house music DJ/remixer Frankie Knuckles and former Bee Gees keyboardist Blue Weaver. Along with new collaborators, comes a change in the Pet Shop Boys approach to making an album. Instead of the standard practice of writing and recording material in the radio friendly length of four to five minutes, then making extended remixes for club play after the fact, the duo do just the reverse. And for the first time, rather than using only synthesizers, sequencers and drum machines, live instrumentation in the forum of an orchestra is used on the album. The six songs that appear on “Introspective” run between six and nine and a half minutes, with edited single versions being released after the fact. The track “I’m Not Scared”, originally written for singer and actress Patsy Kensit’s band Eighth Wonder is re-recorded by Tennant and Lowe, as is another version of their recent hit single “Always On My Mind”, in a medley with “In My House”. Though it is another success for the Pet Shop Boys, particularly in Europe, it draws a mixed response from fans not used to extended form format of the material, and the somewhat muted response to the freestyle flavored first single “Domino Dancing” (#7 UK, #18 US Pop), with the homoerotic overtones of its accompanying music video. In all, the album spins off a total of three singles including “Left To My Own Devices” (#4 UK, #48 US Pop) and “It’s Alright” (#5 UK, #70 US Pop). For promotional purposes in the UK and US, the album is pressed as limited edition triple 12" vinyl set. Ten copies of the set are pressed on clear vinyl and given to EMI Records executives. It is remastered and reissued on CD in 2001 as a double CD set, with a second disc titled “Further Listening” that features remixes, edits, B-sides and demo versions of songs associated with the original release. “Introspective” peaks at number two on the UK album chart and is certified 2x Platinum by the BPI, peaking at number thrity four on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

On this day in music history: September 29, 19…

On this day in music history: September 29, 1986 – “Brotherhood”, the fourth album by New Order is released. Produced by New Order, it is recorded at Jam Studios in London, Windmill Lane Studios in Dublin, Ireland and Amazon Studios in Liverpool, UK from Early – Mid 1986. Stylistically, the album combines the bands earlier post-punk roots with the electronic dance sound that broadens their audience throughout the decade. The centerpiece of the album is the single “Bizarre Love Triangle”, which provides New Order with their breakthrough in the US. Though it fails to chart on the Hot 100, the song is a huge hit on the dance chart (thanks to remixes by Shep Pettibone) peaking at #4 on the Billboard Club Play chart and #8 on the Hot Dance Singles Sales chart. For the track “Every Little Counts”, the band devises an ending to the song in which it sounds like the needle is skipping off the end of the record, indirectly paying homage to the end of The Beatles’ “A Day In The Life” which UK vinyl copies featured a concentric inner groove that plays over and over again (on turntables without an auto return tonearm) until the needle is lifted off of the record. The album is remastered and reissued on CD in 2009, as a double disc deluxe edition. The first disc contains the original ten song album, with disc two featuring 12" remixes and the non-LP B-sides issued at the time. It is also reissued as a 180 gram vinyl LP by Rhino Records. “Brotherhood” peaks at number nine on the UK album chart, and number one hundred sixty one on the Billboard Top 200.

On this day in music history: September 28, 19…

On this day in music history: September 28, 1987 – “Music For The Masses”, the sixth album by Depeche Mode is released. Produced by Depeche Mode and David Bascombe. it is recorded at Studio Guilliame Tell in Paris, France and Konk Studios in London from February – July 1987. Coming on the heels of their previous album “Black Celebration”, the title of the new album is conceived as an in joke between band members having been told by their record company that they “should make more commercial music”. Though Depeche Mode feel the material is anything but commercial, ironically it is their most accessible and best selling album in the US to date. The band support the album with their largest world tour to date. On the US leg of the tour, their sold out live dates at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, CA are captured in the documentary film and album “101”. “Masses” spins off four singles including “Strangelove” (#76 US Pop, #16 UK), “Never Let Me Down Again” (#63 US Pop, #22 UK), and “Behind The Wheel” (#61 US Pop, #21 UK). After the track “Behind The Wheel” is issued as a single, it is remixed various times, including a version that pairs it as a medley with the pop standard “Route 66”. “. The album is remastered and reissued in 2006 as a CD + DVD-A/Video Deluxe Edition. The CD contains the original ten song album, with the DVD disc featuring a 5.1 surround mix. It also includes the documentary short "Depeche Mode: 1987-88 (Sometimes You Do Need Some New Jokes)”, along with audio of nine additional bonus tracks, including non-LP B-sides and remixes.  It is remastered and reissued on vinyl for the first time in 2014 by Rhino Records, and Music On Vinyl. A new pressing (issued with a new catalog number) is released in 2017 by Rhino. “Music For The Masses” peaks at number ten on the UK album chart, number thirty five on the Billboard Top 200, is certified Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

On this day in music history: September 27, 19…

On this day in music history: September 27, 1984 – “Forever Young”, the debut album by Alphaville is released. Produced by Andreas Budde, Wolfgang Loos and Colin Pearson, it is recorded at Studio 54 in Berlin, Germany from July – August 1984. Inspired by British art/glam rockers Roxy Music and German synth pioneers Kraftwerk, Alphaville is formed in West Germany in 1982 by band members Marian Gold (born Hartwig Schierbaum) and Bernhard Lloyd (born Bernhard Gößling). A short time later, they are joined by Frank Mertens, with the trio writing and performing all ten songs on their debut album. The band are signed to WEA International in their native Germany and throughout the rest of the world, and are picked up by Atlantic Records in the US. It spins off four singles including the title track (#65 Pop, #2 Club Play) and “Big In Japan” (#66 Pop, #1 Club Play). Though their singles chart only modestly in the US, “Forever Young” becomes an anthem, through its original version and subsequent uptempo dance remix. The song is released twice, in 1985 and again in 1988. In spite of not cracking the US top 40 on either occasion, it also becomes a favorite at graduation ceremonies and other events. In later years, “Forever Young” is regarded as one of the quintessential synth pop albums of the 80’s. “Forever Young” peaks at number one hundred eighty on the Billboard Top 200.

On this day in music history: September 27, 19…

On this day in music history: September 27, 1982 – “A Broken Frame”, the second album by Depeche Mode​ is released. Produced by Depeche Mode and Daniel Miller, it is recorded at Blackwing Studios in London from December 1981 – July 1982. It is the bands first album to be written entirely by Martin Gore and the first without original member Vince Clarke, who departs to form Yazoo (Yaz) with singer Alison Moyet. Clarke’s replacement Alan Wilder does not actually appear on the album but officially joins the band during their second UK tour that year. The album spins off three singles including “Leave In Silence” and “See You”. The album is remastered in 2006 as a hybrid SACD (high definition Super Audio Compact Disc)/CD with a bonus DVD featuring six songs from a live concert filmed at the Hammersmith Odeon in London in October of 1982. Out of print on vinyl since the late 80’s, it is remastered and reissued as a 180 gram LP in 2007, again by Music On Vinyl in 2014, and is reissued a third time by Mute/Sony Legacy in 2016. “A Broken Frame” peaks at number eight on the UK album chart and number one hundred seventy seven on the Billboard Top 200.

Joji – Demons (Lapalux Remix)

Joji – Demons (Lapalux Remix)

Daydreamer – Skyscrapers

Daydreamer – Skyscrapers