Category: 90125

On this day in music history: November 7, 1983 – “90125”, the eleventh album by Yes is released. Produced by Trevor Horn, it is recorded at SARM West Studios and AIR Studios in London from January 1982, and November 1982 – July 1983. By 1980, founding members lead vocalist Jon Anderson and keyboardist Rick Wakeman depart Yes, moving on to solo projects. Their places are taken by Geoff Downes and Trevor Horn. This line up is short lived, recording and releasing the album “Drama” before Yes disbands completely in December of 1980. After the split, Downes goes on to form Asia with former Yes guitarist Steve Howe, bassist John Wetton and former Emerson Lake & Palmer drummer Carl Palmer. South African born guitarist Trevor Rabin tries out for the guitarist spot in Asia, but ends up connecting with Yes members Chris Squire and Alan White. The trio forms a new band calling themselves Cinema, and begin working on material (including songs that Rabin had written for a solo project), and recording an album in late 1982. The project takes a major turn in the Spring of 1983 when Chris Squire plays some of the work in progress for Jon Anderson. Anderson like the songs so much, that he is invited to participate in the sessions. Without it being intended, the album turns into a reunion of Yes, though keyboardist Tony Kaye sits out much of the recording, not getting along with producer Horn (most of the keyboards are played by Rabin). Yes’ modern streamlined sound differs noticeably from their classic progressive rock period, but in turn wins them a whole new generation of fans. It spins off three singles including Owner Of A Lonely Heart” (#1 Pop), and “Leave It” (#24 Pop). The video for “Leave It”, directed by Godley & Creme, is produced with eighteen variations. A making of documentary for the clip is aired on MTV in early 1984, with all of the variations being aired only once. The album is titled after the catalog number assigned to it, with the distinctive cover graphics being designed using the Robograph 1000 system, utilizing an Apple IIE computer (by graphic artist Garry Mouat at Assorted Images). Yes wins a Grammy Award for Best Rock Instrumental Performance for the track “Cinema” in 1985. First issued on CD in 1984, the album is remastered and reissued in 2004, with six additional bonus tracks. It is also reissued as a hybrid SACD by Warner Music Japan in 2014. The vinyl edition is remastered and reissued as a 180 gram LP by Friday Music in 2009. It is reissued by Rhino Records as a limited edition picture disc for Black Friday Record Store Day in November of 2017. Rhino again reissues it on limited edition vinyl (6,500 copies), as part of their “Back To The 80’s” reissue series in July of 2018. Replicating the original LP packaging, it is pressed on pink, yellow and blue tri-color vinyl. “90125" peaks at number five on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified 3x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

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On this day in music history: November 7, 1983 – “90125”, the eleventh album by Yes is released. Produced by Trevor Horn, it is recorded at SARM West Studios and AIR Studios in London from January 1982, and November 1982 – July 1983. By 1980, founding members lead vocalist Jon Anderson and keyboardist Rick Wakeman depart Yes, moving on to solo projects. Their places are taken by Geoff Downes and Trevor Horn. This line up is short lived, recording and releasing the album “Drama” before Yes disbands completely in December of 1980. After the split, Downes goes on to form Asia with former Yes guitarist Steve Howe, bassist John Wetton and former Emerson Lake & Palmer drummer Carl Palmer. South African born guitarist Trevor Rabin tries out for the guitarist spot in Asia, but ends up connecting with Yes members Chris Squire and Alan White. The trio forms a new band calling themselves Cinema, and begin working on material (including songs that Rabin had written for a solo project), and recording an album in late 1982. The project takes a major turn in the Spring of 1983 when Chris Squire plays some of the work in progress for Jon Anderson. Anderson like the songs so much, that he is invited to participate in the sessions. Without it being intended, the album turns into a reunion of Yes, though keyboardist Tony Kaye sits out much of the recording, not getting along with producer Horn (most of the keyboards are played by Rabin). Yes’ modern streamlined sound differs noticeably from their classic progressive rock period, but in turn wins them a whole new generation of fans. It spins off three singles including Owner Of A Lonely Heart” (#1 Pop), and “Leave It” (#24 Pop). The video for “Leave It”, directed by Godley & Creme, is produced with eighteen variations. A making of documentary for the clip is aired on MTV in early 1984, with all of the variations being aired only once. The album is titled after the catalog number assigned to it, with the distinctive cover graphics being designed using the Robograph 1000 system, utilizing an Apple IIE computer (by graphic artist Garry Mouat at Assorted Images). Yes wins a Grammy Award for Best Rock Instrumental Performance for the track “Cinema” in 1985. First issued on CD in 1984, the album is remastered and reissued in 2004, with six additional bonus tracks. It is also reissued as a hybrid SACD by Warner Music Japan in 2014. The vinyl edition is remastered and reissued as a 180 gram LP by Friday Music in 2009. It is reissued by Rhino Records as a limited edition picture disc for Black Friday Record Store Day in November of 2017. Rhino again reissues it on limited edition vinyl (6,500 copies), as part of their “Back To The 80’s” reissue series in July of 2018. Replicating the original LP packaging, it is pressed on pink, yellow and blue tri-color vinyl. “90125" peaks at number five on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified 3x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

On this day in music history: November 7, 1983 – “90125”, the eleventh album by Yes is released. Produced by Trevor Horn, it is recorded at SARM West Studios and AIR Studios in London from January 1982, and November 1982 – July 1983. By 1980, founding members lead vocalist Jon Anderson and keyboardist Rick Wakeman depart Yes, moving on to solo projects.  Their places are taken by Geoff Downes and Trevor Horn. This line up of the band will be short lived, recording and releasing the album “Drama” before Yes disbands completely in December of 1980. After the split, Downes goes on to form Asia with former Yes guitarist Steve Howe, bassist John Wetton and former Emerson Lake & Palmer drummer Carl Palmer.  South African born guitarist Trevor Rabin tries out for the guitarist spot in Asia, but ends up connecting with Yes members Chris Squire and Alan White. The trio forms a new band calling themselves Cinema, and begin working on material (including songs that Rabin had written for a solo project), and recording an album in late 1982. The project takes a major turn in the Spring of 1983 when Chris Squire plays some of the work in progress for Jon Anderson. Anderson likes the songs so much that he is invited to participate in the sessions. Without it being intended, the album turns into a reunion of Yes, though keyboardist Tony Kaye sits out much of the recording, not getting along with producer Horn (most of the keyboards are played by Rabin on the album). Yes’ modern streamlined sound differs noticeably from their classic progressive rock period, but in turn wins them a whole new generation of fans. It spins off three singles including Yes’ biggest hit Owner Of A Lonely Heart” (#1 Pop), and “Leave It” (#24 Pop). The album is titled after the catalog number assigned to it, with the distinctive cover graphics being designed using the Robograph 1000 system utilising Apple IIE computer (by graphic artist Garry Mouat at Assorted Images). Yes wins a Grammy Award for Best Rock Instrumental Performance for the track “Cinema” in 1985. “90125″ peaks at number five on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified 3x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.