On this day in music history: January 21, 1989…

On this day in music history: January 21, 1989 – “Two Hearts” by Phil Collins hits #1 on the Hot 100 for 2 weeks, also topping the Adult Contemporary chart for 5 weeks on December 24, 1988. Written and produced by Phil Collins and Lamont Dozier, it is the sixth US chart topper for the British born singer, songwriter and musician. Having previously worked as a child actor (as well as appearing as an extra in The Beatles first film “A Hard Day’s Night”), Collins revives his acting career in the 80’s with an appearance on an episode of “Miami Vice” in 1985. In 1987, he is offered the lead role in the film “Buster”, a biopic about famed “Great Train Robber” Buster Edwards. When he initially signs on for the film, Collins specifically tells the producers that he wants to focus on acting and not write or perform any music for the film. Instead, Collins recommends his friend, legendary Motown songwriter Lamont Dozier to write some original songs for the film, which is set in the 1960’s. Phil changes his mind about the music when Dozier plays him the music for the Motown flavored “Two Hearts”. Collins quickly writes the lyrics and record his vocals as well as co-writing the songs “Big Noise” and “Loco In Acapulco”, the latter of which is recorded by The Four Tops. “Two Hearts” is released on November 9, 1988 as the follow up to Collins’ cover of The Mindbenders classic “A Groovy Kind Of Love” which topped the Hot 100 for 2 weeks on October 22, 1988. Entering the Hot 100 at #47 on November 19, 1988, it climbs to the top of the chart nine weeks later. The single is accompanied by a music video directed by long time collaborator Jim Yukich, with Collins playing all of the members of a 60’s era rock band. Featuring a cameo by famed BBC1 DJ and Top Of The Pops host Tony Blackburn, it also recalls the video for Collins’ cover of The Supremes “You Can’t Hurry Love”. “Two Hearts” wins Phil Collins and Lamont Dozier a Grammy Award for Best Song Written Specifically for a Motion Picture or Television in February of 1989, as well as a Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song, tying with Carly Simon’s “Let The River Run” from “Working Girl”. However, Simon bests Collins and Dozier going home with the Academy Award for Best Original Song, when “Two Hearts” is also nominated in the same category.